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Posts Tagged ‘Arc of Baal’

“[B]e it known unto thee … that we will not serve thy gods, nor worship the golden image which thou hast set up.”  Daniel 3:18 KJV

A statue of the Phoenician/Carthaginian deity Molech sits at the entrance to the Roman Colosseum. It is a replica of the statue featured in the 1914 Italian silent film Cabiria.

A Vatican-placed statue of the Canaanite god Molech is creating quite a stir among tourists visiting the Colosseum in Rome these days.

“The Colloseum of Rome is owned by the Vatican … If anyone wants to do anything there, they must get permissions from the office of the Diocese of Rome. This exhibition, called “Cathargo: the immortal myth” could not be held there at all unless permissions were granted at high levels.”

The Molech statue, which has been in front of the Colosseum since September, is part of the Carthago exhibition celebrating Carthaginian culture and art.

Culture and art notwithstanding, some tourists and Roman Catholics are not amused that Molech (one of the most monstrous and terrible pagan deities of the ancient world) sits at the entrance of the most-visited tourist destination in the world where countless Christians were tortured and executed for entertainment.

“Standing guard over the entrance was the colossal pagan statue of Moloch. … [E]veryone that entered into the Colosseum had to pass it. It was like they put Moloch there to mock the sacred place where the holy martyrs spilled their blood …” Alexandra Clark, visitor to the Colosseum

In ancient Carthage, it was customary for Molech worshippers to burn their children alive as offerings to the deity.

Scripture also mentions Molech in the books of Leviticus, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, and Jeremiah where God forbids the Jews “to cause their sons and their daughters to pass through the fire unto Molech.”

Last month the Roman Catholic Church was embroiled in controversy surrounding the opening of the Amazon Synod. A ceremony involving the pagan goddess “Pachamama” was held at Vatican Gardens in the presence of Pope Francis and top-ranking prelates.

The Amazonian Synod ended with Alexander Tschugguel, a frustrated Roman Catholic, tossing the wooden statuettes of the fertility goddess into the Tiber River.

The placement of a pagan god (responsible for the deaths of untold numbers of children) and the ceremony honoring a South American fertility goddess have left some tourists and Roman Catholics looking at the Vatican with jaundice eye.

“Both of these evil pagan idols required child sacrifices and both of them came to Rome at about the same time [as] the Synod.” Alexandra Clark

The Molech statue will remain at the entrance of the Colosseum in Rome until March 29, 2020.

As a side note, ancient pagan deities are being acknowledged in key locations throughout the world today. In 2016, a 50-foot reproduction of the arch that stood at the Temple of Baal, a.k.a. the Arch of Palmyra was temporarilly reconstructed in New York City, London., and Washington D.C.,

 

 

 

 

“[T]hat which is offered in sacrifice to idols is … sacrifice[d] to devils, and not to God: and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils. Ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils: ye cannot be partakers of the Lord’s table, and of the table of devils. 1 Corinthians 10:19, 20,21 KJV

For more on this story, see Statue of ancient god of child sacrifice put on display in Rome and Giant Statue of Moloch Placed Outside the Colosseum in Rome.


The image of Moloch that currently stands outside the Colosseum is modeled after the idol of Moloch from the 1914 Italian silent film Cabiria. In the film, the idol of Moloch sits in a Punic temple and houses a furnace in his chest where children are thrown in and burned alive.

 

Cabiria – The Temple Of Moloch

 

 

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