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Archive for July 18th, 2013

Andrew Marcus’ commentary is on target.

“[I]f you disagree about any given issue with a Progressive, you’re a racist.

Up is down.  One is Four.  Cracker is not a racist term.  Red is blue.  Day is night.  Uncle Thomas is not a racist term.  Death is hilarious.  Water is sand.  Toxic little queen means “I Love Gays!” Welcome to 2013, where language means whatever the heck the Left says it means because they say so and shut up or we’re sicking the IRS on you.

In the world of the Progressive Left, however, only Blacks can be race traitors – and how, you may ask, does a Black person reveal their race betrayal?  By disagreeing with the Progressive Left. … Among the Democratic base, White liberals like [Democrat Minnesota State Rep.] Ryan Winkler are in charge of telling Blacks how and what to think – and if they stray a bit from their prescribed politics, they become an Uncle Thomas.”— Andrew Marcus

On the government plantation, the Democrat Party and its overseers in the mainstream media tell black Americans what they must think. No one in the black community dares express a contrary opinion to the created narrative on any given issue. Blacks who’ve walked off the plantation and expressed opinions contrary to the created narrative have undergone extreme ridicule or have been ostracized from the black community altogether.

Remember when Bill Cosby, Charles Barkley, and Juan Williams dared speak out against the atrocious behavior of black yutes? Well, their rebelliousness didn’t last long once their leftist masters cracked the ole whip. Now that they’re back on the plantation, their opinions are right as rain.

“No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be?”—George Orwell, Animal Farm

I.M. Kane

For more of Marcus’ commentary, see “Cracker and Uncle Thomas.”

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