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Archive for May 5th, 2010

Twenty major donors to the Charlie Crist campaign want their money back. They claim Florida’s forked-tongue governor violated their trust by not staying in the Republican primary.

The Crist campaign has yet to craft an acceptable cock-and-bull response.


Senate donors to Fla. Gov. Crist: Return our money

By Brendan Farrington    

Major donors are asking Florida Gov. Charlie Crist to return money contributed to his Senate campaign now that he’s running as an independent candidate.

In a letter sent Wednesday, the 20 donors say Crist broke the trust of his supporters by not staying in the Republican primary.

Crist decided to run without the backing of his party after falling far behind former House Speaker Marco Rubio in the polls. Other polling shows Crist has a better chance of winning in a three-way race.

U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek is the Democratic front-runner for the seat now held by George LeMieux, who Crist appointed to fill Sen. Mel Martinez’s unexpired term.

A Crist spokeswoman didn’t immediately return a call for comment.

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Propagandist Jonathan Alter, columnist for the Democrat Party organ Newsweek magazine, had interviewed Brother O for his soon-to-be-released book The Promise: President Obama, Year One. According to Alter’s book, Brother O credits the House Republicans’ unanimous vote against the Porkulus Bill with helping “to create the tea-baggers.”  

The President of the United States represents the nation, i.e., all Americans. For the record, the man who currently occupies the Presidency has called millions of Americans tea-baggers, a slang term for the act of a man placing his scrotum in the mouth of a sexual partner.

On two particular occasions during the campaign, Brother O chose his middle finger to scratch his face when referring to Hillary and McCain. Although most Americans were willing to give the community organizer the benefit of the doubt for his suspected low-class behavior, now that the tea-baggers invective has been unleashed at those with whom he politically disagrees, he proves himself a lowlife, leftist ideologue after all.   

By their fruits ye shall know them.

I.M. Kane


 

STRONG BREW

By Jennifer Harper

The term “tea-bagger” is like uttering the “n” word, some say. Though he aspires to promote civility, evidence has surfaced that President Obama has added “tea-bagger” to his public lexicon, though it’s considered a cheap and tawdry insult by “tea party” activists. Watchdogs at Americans for Tax Reform (ATR) barked when they saw the proof, tucked in a sneak peak of Newsweek columnist Jonathan Alter’s new book, “The Promise: President Obama, Year One,” to be released May 18. Indeed, it appears the president joined certain partisan critics and the liberal media, and took the tea-bag plunge.

“This remark is the equivalent of using the ‘n’ word. It shows contempt for middle America, expressed knowingly, contemptuously, on purpose, and with a smirk. It is indefensible to use this word. The president knows what it means, and his people know what it means. The public thought we reached a new low of incivility during the Clinton administration. Well, the Obama administration has just outdone them,” ATR president Grover Norquist tells Inside the Beltway.

There is not always parity in these situations. There were outraged calls for Rep. Dan Burton’s resignation and massive press coverage after the Indiana Republican called President Clinton a “scumbag” during the Monica Lewinsky matter in 1998.

The offending passage that started the tea-bagger shuffle? Mr. Alter wrote, “Obama said that the unanimous House vote against the Recovery Act ‘set the tenor for the whole year’: ‘That helped to create the tea-baggers and empowered that whole wing of the Republican Party to where it now controls the agenda for the Republicans.’ ”

Mr. Obama himself was recently ruing the contentious state of politics, noting Saturday at a college commencement speech, “We’ve got politicians calling each other all sorts of unflattering names. Pundits and talking heads shout at each other. The media tends to play up every hint of conflict, because it makes for a sexier story.”

The watchdogs, incidentally got their advance look at the book in Mike Allen’s “Playbook” in Politico.

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Music executive, television producer, and entrepreneur Simon Cowell says tomorrow’s General Election is an “opportunity to bring back common sense” and pull the country from crisis.

“BRITAIN’S got talent, enormous talent …

But I’ve also learned two other things on my travels.

One is that the majority of our wealth of talented people aren’t being given the chance they need to grow and bloom at the moment.

And two, the country has too many social problems – in particular knife crime and a collapse in family values….

It should be everyone’s birthright to get the chance to fulfil their dream.

Yes, for some it’s being a pop star. But for many more hard-working Brits, it’s something far less flash – it’s starting your own business.

That’s what it was for me. But that’s harder in our country now than it has been for a long time and that really has to change.

It’s not just that the banks won’t lend. The masses of red tape, regulation and political correctness have tied us all up in knots.”—Simon Cowell


Simon Cowell’s vision for a New Britain

By Tom Newton Dunn

TV mogul Simon Cowell says tomorrow’s General Election MUST bring change to Britain.

Writing for The Sun, he signals that the country he deeply loves needs a new government to pull it out of crisis.

Cowell, 50, talks of the need to inspire young people and unlock talent, promote family values, stimulate business and reduce knife crime.

He says: “I have always hated celebrities lecturing people on politics. So forgive me. But I am passionate about this country.

“I am equally passionate about the potential of the people who live here.”

He warns of the dangers of a hung parliament and casts doubts on the Lib Dems and Nick Clegg, saying: “I worry about a lot of his policies.”

And of Tory leader David Cameron, he says: “I like him, I trust him. He has substance and the stomach to navigate us through difficult times.”

Cowell insists he is NOT telling anyone how to vote. But he calls the poll an “opportunity to bring back common sense” – and give people hope.

It came as support for the Lib Dems collapsed to just 24 per cent, with Conservatives in a commanding 35 per cent lead and Labour on 30 per cent.

Here, the man behind X Factor and Britain’s Got Talent spells out why tomorrow’s General Election is the country’s opportunity for change.

“BRITAIN’S got talent, enormous talent, that’s very obvious.

I have had the great fortune of being able to see so much of it as I have toured the country for my TV shows over the past few years.

But I’ve also learned two other things on my travels.

One is that the majority of our wealth of talented people aren’t being given the chance they need to grow and bloom at the moment.

And two, the country has too many social problems – in particular knife crime and a collapse in family values.

I thought the party leaders’ TV debates were terrific and I watched all three. For the first time, the general public was given an opportunity to hear the debates and to get to know the party leaders.

But I don’t believe a General Election is the X Factor.

Choosing how you vote should not be a snap verdict based on a few minutes of television. We are not talent show judges picking pretty-sounding contestants now.

The future government of our country is so much more important than that.

It should be everyone’s birthright to get the chance to fulfil their dream.

Yes, for some it’s being a pop star. But for many more hard-working Brits, it’s something far less flash – it’s starting your own business.

That’s what it was for me. But that’s harder in our country now than it has been for a long time and that really has to change.

It’s not just that the banks won’t lend. The masses of red tape, regulation and political correctness have tied us all up in knots.

On this I agree with Sir Philip Green – one of Britain’s most successful businessmen, who runs the clothing chain Arcadia, including Top Shop, Miss Selfridge, Burton and Dorothy Perkins.

It’s the government’s job to encourage entrepreneurialism and investment. Most importantly, it’s the government’s duty to inspire confidence.

It should give hope to the younger generation to build on our wonderful heritage. It should inspire us to get out there and create and invent.

And then it should get right out of the way.

Right now it takes twice as long to start a business in the UK as it does in the USA. I was recently told that around 40,000 new regulations have been introduced since 1998 – that’s 14 every working day.

Then we were ranked 4th in world for least burdensome regulation. Now we are 86th. The problem with this tinkering is the State can stifle and frustrate ambition, rather than encourage entrepreneurs, which is crazy.

There’s another thing I agree with Philip on about the economy, along with almost every other business leader in Britain.

Tackling the national debt mountain as soon as possible is vital.

Whether they run a record company or a grocery store, every boss will tell you you’re in big trouble if you’re borrowing more than you can ever afford to pay back.

Delaying the pain for future generations is suicidal. We’ve got to start getting the deficit down right now, not next year.

And this comes back to a bigger problem. I have always believed family plays a massive role in helping young people achieve.

Everyone can only benefit from the encouragement of their mum and dad. I certainly did, and remain eternally grateful for it too.

I worry that we are losing that old-school respect.

And I think this is down to a breakdown of rules. When I was young and we got caught pinching apples, we got a smack from the local policeman. Today if that happened he would be sued.

There is a tendency to punish the victim, not the criminal. If someone broke into my house or my mum’s house, I worry that the burglar has more rights than me.

Knife crime is out of control. Over 100 serious knife crimes are committed every single day in this country.

And now I feel you are more likely to be convicted of speeding at 45 miles an hour than if you knifed somebody in the street. The problem is we have just got used to this.

Part of the solution is zero tolerance to anyone carrying a knife, but also giving kids who have run out of hope the feeling that they are being listened to and they have a future.

Tomorrow is the big day. Here’s my opinion of the three party leaders if you want it. I have met two of them.

I have spoken with Gordon and his wife on several occasions. They were both charming and Gordon is a very sincere man who I respect.

He has given a lot of support for our shows and artists but I worry after all of this time how much more energy he can devote to a huge task ahead of him.

I have met David on two occasions. I liked him immediately. I trust him and he was very quick to commit to helping with a serious funding deficit for a children’s hospice charity I am involved with.

I have always trusted my gut instinct – and this was a guy who I thought would do the right things for this country.

I believe he is the Prime Minister Britain needs at this time. He has substance and the stomach to navigate us through difficult times.

I have yet to meet Nick Clegg but he is made for TV. I worry about a lot of his policies and I don’t get a clear direction of what he stands for.

Personally I think the worst result is a hung parliament. It ends in months of stupid arguments and then a dull compromise, which means nothing will ever get achieved.

I have always hated celebrities lecturing people on politics. So forgive me. But I am passionate about this country and I am equally passionate about the potential of the people who live here.

My proudest achievement has been the success of the shows and artists I have been involved with, because they were made in Britain.

I believe everyone has the right to be heard and the right to make a better life for themselves.

I have seen that the American Dream is a reality – and I would love to feel the British Dream is also a reality.

To enable that, we have to bring back some common sense and encourage family values, a proper sense of justice and make people believe they have a decent chance to build a business or career for themselves. I see this moment as a fantastic opportunity to restore this, because I believe Britain Has Talent.”

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