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Archive for May 4th, 2010

At the root of the problem is the Government’s failure to carry out land reforms that meet black aspirations without destroying the productive agricultural sector. It wants at least one third of productive farm land to be in black hands by 2014 but is way off target. The land bank set up to finance farm purchases is broke; fleeced by its own managers, with a corruption investigation under way.

40,000 farmers in South Africa

3,000 farmers murdered since the end of apartheid

20% of South Africans of all races want to emigrate, with 95 per cent of those naming violent crime as the single most important factor.—Jonathan Clayton

Where are the cries from the Hollywood left denouncing the atrocities and human rights violations? Their silent criticism of communist brutality is reminiscent of the Cambodian killing fields.

I.M Kane


‘We’re in the final days of white life in South Africa’

By Jonathan Clayton in Vredefort

The gunman leant forward and pushed the pistol hard into Manie Potgieter’s neck.

“Listen, you white bastard,” he whispered, his breath heavy with alcohol. “I have Aids. We are now going to rape your wife and give her Aids too. Then, we kill you, got it?”

From his position on the floor, hands tied behind his back, he could hear his assailant’s three accomplices pulling the tracksuit bottoms off his wife, Helena, 28.

“I was sure they were going to shoot me, but I just prayed she would be OK. She was telling me in Afrikaans not to worry. I just prayed,” Mr Potgieter, 30, a blond giant of a man, told The Times.

Suddenly, a clang of metal echoed through the early morning air — and the attackers took fright. They had been in the remote farmhouse for an hour and dawn was fast approaching. “Let’s go, someone is coming,” one of them shouted in panic. Without firing a shot they were suddenly gone.

The Potgieters’ nightmare was over — but it was one of the very few happy endings to a spate of attacks on South Africa’s white Afrikaner farming communities in which an estimated 3,000 people have been killed since 1994.

On another farm, a few miles away, Louis Boshoff, 65, and his wife, Elsabe, 57, were not so lucky. A few months ago, Mr Boshoff arose early one morning, as he has done for almost 47 years, to milk his small dairy herd.

“Two men were hiding in one of the outdoor sheds. They had balaclavas on and came at me. One had a gun and the other a catapult with ball bearings as shot,” he said.

When one of them fired at his barking dogs, Mr Boshoff saw red and tried to rush them, but he was shot twice. He lost his spleen, most of his pancreas and half his liver. His wife rushed to be at his side, tripped and suffered a broken leg.

The subject of attacks on white farmers is deeply disliked by the ruling African National Congress for the unflattering comparisons that it brings with neighbouring Zimbabwe, but it has come to the fore since the murder of the white supremacist leader Eugène Terre’Blanche a month ago. That incident followed a sharp deterioration in race relations after Julius Malema, the outspoken leader of the ANC’s Youth League, started singing at rallies an old anti-apartheid struggle song that includes the words “shoot the boer [farmer]”.

The High Court banned the song but the ruling is now under appeal. Mr Malema faces an ANC disciplinary hearing after he defied orders and continued to sing the song while visiting Zimbabwe, where he praised President Mugabe for land reform policies, under which 4,000 white commercial farmers have been driven off the land in the past decade.

Since Terre’Blanche’s murder the farm attacks have continued unabated. Last week another two white farmers were killed in separate attacks.

“The murder of TB [Terre’Blanche] was planned. They start singing ‘kill the boer’ — then the most famous boer of the lot is murdered. I did not support him, but do not tell me it is not linked,” said Ian Bothma, 47, a tradesman from Terre’Blanche’s home town who has recently applied to emigrate to Australia. “We are now in the final days of white life in this country.”

The Government points out that blacks are also the targets of farm attacks; black unions, for their part, emphasise that, 16 years after the end of apartheid, many black farm workers are still ill treated, with their white employers accused of fuelling the violence by paying derisory wages and using illegal migrant labour.

At the root of the problem is the Government’s failure to carry out land reforms that meet black aspirations without destroying the productive agricultural sector. It wants at least one third of productive farm land to be in black hands by 2014 but is way off target. The land bank set up to finance farm purchases is broke; fleeced by its own managers, with a corruption investigation under way.

Andre Botha, chairman of Agriculture South Africa’s rural safety committee, told parliament recently that the biggest challenge facing the industry was “irresponsible remarks” by officials and politicians. “If we are excluded from being South African then there is a big question mark put on democracy,” he said.

Last week, President Zuma promised that there would be no Zimbabwean-style land grabs — but most whites are not convinced. “I was born and bred here but it is time to go,” Mr Bothma said. “It is unfair to inflict such a future on our children.”

Land in crisis

40,000 farmers in South Africa

3,000 farmers murdered since the end of apartheid

800,000 white South Africans out of a total of 4.4 million have emigrated since 1995

200,000 hectares of abandoned farmland has been leased by the Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo to farmers fleeing South Africa

87% of agricultural land was owned by whites at the end of the apartheid era

30% of land must be in black hands by 2014, if government targets for land reform are to be met

2% of land has changed hands so far, with funds for further purchases having dried up and a corruption inquiry under way

20% of South Africans of all races want to emigrate, with 95 per cent of those naming violent crime as the single most important factor

Sources: Times database; BBC; Newsweek; Australian Department of Immigration

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I would like to extend my gratitude to fellow patriot bloggers at the Table of Wisdom and elvisnixon.com for their kind words regarding my Kittanning tea party speech, “The Managers of America’s Decline,” and for posting it on their Web sites. I also want to thank Mr. Arbitrage for posting the speech up on the Free Republic site.

I visit both of their sites regularly and invite the readers of the The Millstone Diaries to do likewise. Like many of you, they are God-fearing, likeminded patriots who are fighting the good fight to save our country from political despotism and collectivist tyranny.

I am appreciative … I am indebted …

I.M. Kane

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(H-T Joe)

If Federal officials had stocked fire booms on hand as required by the government’s 1994 “In-Situ Burn” plan, at least 95 percent of the oil spill would have been contained and away from land.  Instead, they lied:

“They said this was the tool of last resort. No, this is absolutely the asset of first use. Get in there and start burning oil before the spill gets out of hand. If they had six or seven of these systems in place when this happened and got out there and started burning, it would have significantly lessened the amount of oil that got loose.”—Jeff Bohleber, chief financial officer for Elastec, the company that makes fire booms.

According to the New York Times, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano did not know the Defense Department had oil spill equipment.

Brother O finally visited the disaster area May 2, a mere 12 days after the rig exploded.

White House pathological liar Robert Gibbs hurriedly posted a blog titled “The Response to the Oil Spill so Far,” outlining the Bread and Circuses’ response since the spill, emphasizing that Brother O reacted “immediately” and “quickly,” and how he “early on” directed responding agencies to devote every resource to the incident and determining its cause.

Last night Fox’s Buffo Bill O’Reilly mocked those who blame Brother O and the Bread and Circuses Administration for not moving quickly enough in the Gulf. During a conversation with Bernie Goldberg on the O’Reilly Factor, Buffo Bill asked rhetorically:

“What was Obama supposed to do? Go out there with a net? … I mean what was he supposed to do? There isn’t anything you can do? … I don’t know what President Obama can do to stop the oil slick. You know they can’t cap it, and that’s the problem. Maybe he could put a dive suit on and go down … whaddyado?”   

Another bold fresh piece of crap from Buffo Bill! He must be pining for another Brother O interview.  

I.M. Kane


 

Despite plan, not a single fire boom on hand on Gulf Coast at time of oil spill

By Ben Raines

If U.S. officials had followed up on a 1994 response plan for a major Gulf oil spill, it is possible that the spill could have been kept under control and far from land.

The problem: The federal government did not have a single fire boom on hand.

The “In-Situ Burn” plan produced by federal agencies in 1994 calls for responding to a major oil spill in the Gulf with the immediate use of fire booms.

But in order to conduct a successful test burn eight days after the Deepwater Horizon well began releasing massive amounts of oil into the Gulf, officials had to purchase one from a company in Illinois.

When federal officials called, Elastec/American Marine, shipped the only boom it had in stock, Jeff Bohleber, chief financial officer for Elastec, said today.

At federal officials’ behest, the company began calling customers in other countries and asking if the U.S. government could borrow their fire booms for a few days, he said.

A single fire boom being towed by two boats can burn up to 1,800 barrels of oil an hour, Bohleber said. That translates to 75,000 gallons an hour, raising the possibility that the spill could have been contained at the accident scene 100 miles from shore.

“They said this was the tool of last resort. No, this is absolutely the asset of first use. Get in there and start burning oil before the spill gets out of hand,” Bohleber said. “If they had six or seven of these systems in place when this happened and got out there and started burning, it would have significantly lessened the amount of oil that got loose.”

In the days after the rig sank, U.S Coast Guard Rear Admiral Mary Landry said the government had all the assets it needed. She did not discuss why officials waited more than a week to conduct a test burn. (Watch video footage of the test burn.)

At the time, former National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration oil spill response coordinator Ron Gouguet — who helped craft the 1994 plan — told the Press-Register that officials had pre-approval for burning. “The whole reason the plan was created was so we could pull the trigger right away.”

Gouguet speculated that burning could have captured 95 percent of the oil as it spilled from the well.

Bohleber said that his company was bringing several fire booms from South America, and he believed the National Response Center discovered that it had one in storage.

Each boom costs a few hundred thousand dollars, Bohleber said, declining to give a specific price.

Made of flame-retardant fabric, each boom has two pumps that push water through its 500-foot length. Two boats tow the U-shaped boom through an oil slick, gathering up about 75,000 gallons of oil at a time. That oil is dragged away from the larger spill, ignited and burns within an hour, he said.

The boom can be used as long as waves are below 3 feet, Bohleber said.

“Because of the complexity of the system and the obvious longer production time to build them, the emphasis is on obtaining and gathering the systems,” he said.

Bohleber said his company has conducted numerous tests with the Coast Guard since 1993, and it is now training crews on the use of the boom so workers will be ready when they arrive.

“We’re arranging for six to be shipped in. We keep running into delays. Hopefully, they will be here by Wednesday to be available for use on Thursday. Bear in mind, two days ago, we thought they would be here today.”

See continuing coverage of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill of 2010 on al.com and GulfLive.com.

To keep track of the Gulf of Mexico oil slick, visit http://blog.skytruth.org/ or follow its Twitter feed.

To see updated projection maps related to the oil spill in the Gulf, visit the Deepwater Horizon Response Web site established by government officials.

How to help: Volunteers eager to help cope with the spill and lessen its impact on the Gulf Coast environment and economy.

HOW YOU CAN HELP will appear daily in the Press-Register until there is no longer a need for volunteers in response to the oil spill disaster. If you have suggestions for a story, or if you belong to an organization in need of such help, please call Press-Register Editor Mike Marshall at 251-219-5675 or email him at mmarshall@press-register.com.

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